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Need help now?  Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1.800.273.8255
Need Help Now? Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. 1.800.273.8255

loss survivors

Another star gone too soon: Linkin Park's Chester Bennington

We just heard the devastating news that Linkin Park frontman Chester Bennington took his own life today. A father of six and an immensely talented musician, Chester’s suicide is a blow to millions - including suicide prevention advocates who are also music aficionados (and vice versa).

Chester Bennington, Linkin Park frontman

As the world reacts, here are a few talking points the public should know:

In Norway, medicine alone is insufficient in treating mental health. Here’s what we can learn from their solutions.

“You have to treat the root of the problem, and not just operate on the symptoms,” explained Ebbem, a Norwegian medical student and my seatmate on a recent flight from Oslo to Amsterdam. “When I did my psychiatric rotations in northern Norway, I would ask people ‘How are you today?’ and they would talk for great lengths and detail about everything that was bothering them. It was as if no one had ever asked them ‘How are you today?’ It was clear they had a lot to get off their chest. It helped that I was an outsider who they had never met and had no long-term presence in their community.”

Overlooked, underfunded: Men in the middle years (MIMY) suicides

Men in the middle years — that is, men between the ages of 35 to 64 — make up less than a fifth of the U.S. population. They also account for 40 percent of suicides.

As I mentioned in the Suicide Prevention Resource Center’s (SPRC) Spark Talk video, because of the large number of people in this demographic and its high rate of suicide, it will not be possible to reduce the overall number of suicides in the U.S. unless the MIMY suicide rate drops.

A suicide loss survivor's wise & healing words

Kristen Spexarth It's rare to find a person who can accurately and meaningfully describe the unique agony of someone who has lost a loved one to suicide. In fact, it takes someone who has known that pain first-hand. Kristen Spexarth knows it from the loss of her son, Colby, and she has bravely and lovingly found the words to describe her journey—beautiful, wise words that are a balm to me and to many other suicide loss survivors.

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