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Need help now?  Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1.800.273.8255
Need Help Now? Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. 1.800.273.8255

mental health

Another star gone too soon: Linkin Park's Chester Bennington

We just heard the devastating news that Linkin Park frontman Chester Bennington took his own life today. A father of six and an immensely talented musician, Chester’s suicide is a blow to millions - including suicide prevention advocates who are also music aficionados (and vice versa).

Chester Bennington, Linkin Park frontman

As the world reacts, here are a few talking points the public should know:

Three years ago today, Conrad Roy died by suicide - leaving behind hard lessons

We all empathize with our friends and family, when they are going through a rough time. All we want to do is help take their pain away—and there are a variety of paths we can take to help them with that pain. For loved ones struggling with their mental health, there are also multiple ways to try and alleviate that pain, but suicide should never be one that is encouraged because no matter how bad life can seem, there are always better routes to take. 

Why young South Koreans struggle to be happy: The ominous intersections of traditional culture and modern development

Thirty-six-year old Lee Kyoung-ja married 39 year-old Cho Hyuk-jin — both natives of South Korea — in the fall of 2015. They relocated to Vietnam a few months later without a concrete plan for work. On the surface, their decision was shocking. Kyoung-ja, my close friend from my four years living in Korea and the MC at my wedding, was a voice actress. She had consistent, well-paid work, and her new husband was a successful television commercial producer at Samsung.

As Increasing Numbers of Less Educated, Middle-aged White People Die From ‘Diseases of Despair,’ How Should We Talk About Suicide?

Death by diseases of despair in 2015: Suicide, alcohol, and overdose-related deaths among Caucasians (per 100,000). Graphic by Forefront.Middle-aged white people in the United States are bucking a global trend as they face an escalation in deaths from suicide, overdose and alcohol related deaths, according to a study from Anne Case and Angus Deaton of Princeton University.

In Norway, medicine alone is insufficient in treating mental health. Here’s what we can learn from their solutions.

“You have to treat the root of the problem, and not just operate on the symptoms,” explained Ebbem, a Norwegian medical student and my seatmate on a recent flight from Oslo to Amsterdam. “When I did my psychiatric rotations in northern Norway, I would ask people ‘How are you today?’ and they would talk for great lengths and detail about everything that was bothering them. It was as if no one had ever asked them ‘How are you today?’ It was clear they had a lot to get off their chest. It helped that I was an outsider who they had never met and had no long-term presence in their community.”

Overlooked, underfunded: Men in the middle years (MIMY) suicides

Men in the middle years — that is, men between the ages of 35 to 64 — make up less than a fifth of the U.S. population. They also account for 40 percent of suicides.

As I mentioned in the Suicide Prevention Resource Center’s (SPRC) Spark Talk video, because of the large number of people in this demographic and its high rate of suicide, it will not be possible to reduce the overall number of suicides in the U.S. unless the MIMY suicide rate drops.

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